Drinking water work ethic benefits

Drink More Water & Improve Your Work Ethic

ID 100152162 300x199 Drink More Water & Improve Your Work EthicIf you were asked to list some of the benefits that come from drinking water, they’d probably include such things as weight loss, detox and clearer skin.

But what if drinking more water throughout your day could also have positive effects that could improve your work ethic and ultimately your performance. Read on to find out just how your increased intake of H20 could see you climb the corporate ladder.

Drinking water can improve reaction time

Researchers conducting studies at the University of East London discovered that people who drank a pint of water before conducing mental tasks had reaction times that were up to 14% faster than those who did not have any. Underlining how mild dehydration can impact a person’s mental performance, the study reinforces the fact that since our brains are around 80% water, it really is important to make sure it gets enough water. The same results were seen in previous work by the same scientists who found that school pupils who drank more water had improved attention spans and memory.

The effects of dehydration

It might come as a surprise but many of us enter into a state of dehydration, however mild it may be, especially in summer. And its effects can wreak havoc with our work ethics. Not only can workers experience back pain, muscle fatigue, headaches, apparent hunger and general ill health, but poor concentration and ultimately poor work ethic as well. By simply increasing the intake of water on a daily basis, workers will reap the rewards with increased focus and a longer attention span – both of which can only mean good things for your job performance and perhaps even your career.

Hydration at work

While it’s true that some types of work may call for an increased daily water requirement purely as a result of their very nature, there is no harm that comes from upping your intake. Warmer days lead to increased perspiration and higher water requirements. You may not realise, however, that an air conditioned office can speed up moisture evaporation from our skin and lungs, which also requires an increased amount of water intake. Meaning that office workers and athletes are both towards the higher level of water intake, albeit for different reasons.

Water and the brain

The brain is particularly senstive to changes in water balance, which explains why dehydration can affect our mental performance and by relation, our overall work-related productivity. One study demonstrated this by exploring the effects of water deprivation on the mental performance of male and female volunteers. The results found that those who were dehydrated were more likely to feel sluggish and tired, which meant that they needed significantly more effeort to perform their tasks when compared to the effort that was required of them when they were adequately hydrated.

Water and your mood

Another aspect of ourselves that can negatively affected by water deprivation is our moods – a characteristic that is, arguably, quite valuable in the workplace. When we lack water, we can feel increasingly agitated, impatient and tense. And if our mood is deteriorating rapidly due to a lack in water intake, then the effects can only be negative for our overwall mental well-being and work ethic.

Top tips for drinking water in the workplace

With a clear connection between the amount of water we drink daily and our job performance, we’ve decided to include some top tips that will help you to stay hydrated.

  • Workspaces that are air conditioned or warm both call for an increased intake of water throughout the day. We recommend that you drink water before you feel thirsty to keep the negative effects of dehydration at bay.
  • Men in the workplace should aim for a total daily water intake of around 2.5-litres, while women in the workplace should aim for around 2-litres.
  • Drinking small amounts of water a regular intervals helps to reduce headaches caused by dehydration, while increasing focus.
The Water Delivery Company